The Architecture of Happiness

ISBN9780307277244
PublisherVintage 
Published04/09/2012
Pages288
AuthorAlain De Botton
FormatPAPERBACK
Weight0.4 Kg.
Height8.0 in.
Width6.1 in.
Depth0.5 in.

The Architecture of Happiness

Alain De Botton

PAPERBACK

04/09/2012

The Achitecture of Happiness is a dazzling and generously illustrated journey through the philosophy and psychology of architecture and the indelible connection between our identities and our locations.One of the great but often unmentioned causes of both happiness and misery is the quality of our environment: the kinds of walls, chairs, buildings, and streets that surround us. And yet a concern for architecture is too often described as frivolous, even self-indulgent. Alain de Botton starts from the idea that where we are heavily influences who we can be, and argues that it is architecture's task to stand as an eloquent reminder of our full potential.

The Architecture of Happiness

Alain De Botton

₱874.00

Information

ISBN9780307277244
PublisherVintage 
Published04/09/2012
Pages288
AuthorAlain De Botton
FormatPAPERBACK
Weight0.4 Kg.
Height8.0 in.
Width6.1 in.
Depth0.5 in.

Synopsis

The Achitecture of Happiness is a dazzling and generously illustrated journey through the philosophy and psychology of architecture and the indelible connection between our identities and our locations.One of the great but often unmentioned causes of both happiness and misery is the quality of our environment: the kinds of walls, chairs, buildings, and streets that surround us. And yet a concern for architecture is too often described as frivolous, even self-indulgent. Alain de Botton starts from the idea that where we are heavily influences who we can be, and argues that it is architecture's task to stand as an eloquent reminder of our full potential.

Editorial Reviews

"The strength of his book is that it encourages us to open our eyes and really look at the buildings in which we live and work."

– Publishers Weekly

"Throughout, de Botton argues that the buildings we walk by, work in or come home to affect how we feel. They influence our mood, our sensibility, our very character. No one is likely to disagree with this, especially those of us who dispiritedly sink down into our windowless office cubicles day after day or vainly yearn for just one room, let alone an entire house, like those in Architectural Digest."

– The Washington Post