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Women Writers Who Shaped Our Lives

Women Writers Who Shaped Our Lives

In celebration of Women's Month, we asked the lovely people over at Bookworm Corner which women writers have helped shape their lives. Read their sharings below.


Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott

I've lived with the March sisters since childhood—so much so that their experiences, their sorrows and joys, feel like my memories. I seethed with anger when Amy burned Jo's book; I felt Amy's humiliation when her friends didn't show up to the party she prepared and spent for; I was equally deflated and frustrated when Meg's jelly wouldn't jell. Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, whose power I think comes from its autofictional depth, helped me understand the challenges of exploring your own desires and ambitions within your economic capabilities while also negotiating societal/familial expectations—something that only comes alive when you reread the book as an adult. The book gave me a sort of map through which I could navigate my womanhood and femininity throughout the various phases of my life. For that, I am forever grateful.

Shared by Ilia

Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood

I love the way she writes of women, especially older women, angry women, passionate women. I love her themes of speculative fiction, climate change, thriller, almost sci-fi.

Shared by Krista

Jane Austen

Jane Austen

I love Austen. Read all her books. Used to read Pride & Prejudice yearly. I know some people find her boring, but she was honestly one of the writers who taught me that Victorian-era women writers can be exciting and hilarious. Her main characters seem very confined by the world that they live in, but they also fight for their own happiness and agency within that world. I also love how they can insult someone very prettily.

Shared by Honey

Lualhati Bautista

Lualhati Bautista

While these works primarily discuss the life under the Marcos dictatorship, its second major theme is women's liberation.

Shared by Karl

Enid Blyton

Enid Blyton

Sadly I have since learned of the racist undertones of her work; but as a very young girl I was not aware of it. What I was aware of was how her Famous Five and Secret Seven series taught me that books can introduce you to different worlds and different characters; and that girls can be as adventurous and as outspoken as boys.

Sharaed by Krista

Anne Frank

Anne Frank

I think Anne Frank's life story is a lesson on what happens when humanity goes to the extremes of an ideology. Anne Frank's diary is a snippet of resilience in the face of adversity. There was one time when she had a still moment, and i think it's beautiful: "I looked out of the open window too, over a large area of Amsterdam, over all the roofs and on to the horizon, which was such a pale blue that it was hard to see the dividing line. "As long as this exists," I thought, "and I may live to see it, this sunshine, the cloudless skies, while this lasts, I cannot be unhappy"

Shared by book newb

Ursula K Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin

The best fantasy and science fiction are those that use its premises to explore human nature. Ursula Le Guin's stories are always investigating human characteristics that seem innate or natural but are revealed not so when placed in a different context. Reading Le Guin has me a more thoughtful, more reflective person and I do think I'm not the only one.

Shared by Ilia

Harper Lee

Harper Lee

I know it’s a little bit cliche to love To Kill a Mockingbird right now, but I still do. It gave me Scout, a voice who was smart, innocent, brave, reckless, and kind. I loved everything about her. Loved that she got into fights, loved that she loved to read, loved that she misjudged people, but was honest enough to admit that she did. And I loved that her whole story was really just an aside to the explanation of how her brother broke his arm.

Shared by Honey

Lucy Maud Montgomery

Lucy Maud Montgomery

She introduced Anne Shirley to the world who depicts a strong-willed, independent, and vivacious woman. With Anne's character in each book, I was so inspired that I sometimes wished I can be like her. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables also made me fell in love with Prince Edward Island.

Shared by Patty

Celeste Ng

Celeste Ng

The subtle connection between communal race issues and intimate familial struggles is a testament to her brave storytelling.

Shared by Era

JK Rowling

J. K. Rowling

The world that she weaved meant a lot to me when I was growing up. Harry Potter has been my solace in a time where books are the only source of escape in a bleak and traumatic era - my teenage years.

Shared by Cielo

Amy Tan

Amy Tan

Much of a woman's life is shaped by our relationships with our mothers and Amy Tan understands this so deeply. Reading her novels at a young age helped me see that my mother is also just a person with her own struggles, both shackled and propelled by her formative past, hoping to make her own future. I loved that Amy Tan helped reinforced the notion that mother-daughter relationships are worthy of literary examination. I wouldn't have been the same writer AND person without reading her books.

Shared by Ilia


Find these and more great reads by great women at Fully Booked branches and Fully Booked Online.



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